Want Your Child To Read At Advanced Level? Find Out Why Parents Highly Recommended This Program

Giving children an early start in education is every parent's wish. Many studies have supported the fact that preparing children early - before they start school - sets the foundation for future success in school.
For keen parents wanting to give their children a better start, there are many educational programs (and smartphone apps) available for free; as well as those that are purchasable. But, knowing the right option, age-appropriate for the younger children can be a hassle. This post identifies one highly recommended learning programs for children - Reading Eggs.

The Reading Eggs is a fun-filled educational software for children ages 3 years old to 13 years old. Parents of children who've used the software have seen *significant* improvement in their children's ability to read and write and learn about numbers.

Why Reading Eggs?

The Maths Factor is another learning program available, but I am also a fan of the Reading Eggs. One of the best features of Reading Eggs is the *Reward*. The Reading Eggs reward system motives kids to keep exploring and learning.  My kids have used it since they were 3 years old – fantastic learning program, highly recommended. 

Here is a brief citation from Reading Eggs:

“Children love the games, songs, golden eggs and other rewards which, along with feeling proud of their reading, really motivate children to keep exploring and learning.” Reading Egg (accessed 23/11/2017)

Many parents of young children have recommended the Reading Eggs (see testimonials here). Your children can have fun and learn to read, early, both at home or when you are out-and-about.

Perhaps giving children the best start early in life is the best thing to do as parents. This paves way for both academic success and success in life - reading is a life skill and every child should know how to read. The best way to learn how to read is to learn about LETTER SOUNDS. Find out how you can help your child learn letter sounds as the first of the 5 steps of learning to read by following the link.

Reading Eggs Fun

The 5 points are the main reasons why the Reading Eggs is proven to be popular among many parents:
1.    Cater for children ages 3 – 13 years old;  
2.    Highly interactive and reward-based – children play, earn points and learn;  
3.    Accessible via Personal (Home) Computers and Smartphones;  
4.    *Free* online trial permitted - no need to enter bank card details prior to the unlimited free trial; 
5.    Over 90% of parents indicated noticeable *improvement* in their children.

For more information (or if you would want to get your child started with a *free* on-line trial today) click here.

Curriculum and Structural Changes: Intensive Early Childhood Education Has Long-lasting Effects on Learning

The education system has undergone several changes. Here are some highlights of the changes in the School Curriculum and School Structure in Papua New Guinea. To clarify, curriculum change would mean the the change from the Standard-Based Education (SBE) to Outcome-Based Education (OBE) and vice versa. Whereas the Structural Change refers to the arrangement (and rearrangement) of Grades composition within the schools. 


Brief

Many students in the 1990s will remember the curriculum change that took place. Talks about the change started in 1993/1994. The actual curriculum shift - from the more established SBE to the troublesome OBE - happened in 1995.

 Twenty-one (21) years later, (and after much criticism of OBE) the curriculum reverted to SBE in 2016. This year, 2017, would be the second year of implementing SBE in classrooms around the country. The interesting observation is that there is *no* information about what actually is transpiring in classrooms. It could imply either all is well or something is seriously not right.

Change as a process

Understandably, change – as a process – needs monitoring and reporting on an on-going basis. After 2 years of SBE many questions needing answers as the country's education system moves into the third year of SBE implementation:

  • How are all the key stakeholders monitoring the progress and reporting? 
  • How are the teachers coping in the classrooms? 
  • Is there any significant transformation happening in classrooms nationwide?

Furthermore, in 2015 the Education Department hinted a change in overall School/Education Structure. And, implied to take effect, in 2016, starting with schools in the main centres (This had not materialised). The image gives details of the structural changes, including the attempt changes: 


1.    Pre-1995 (6-4-2 structure) 

  • 12 years of schooling
  • Primary School Grades 1 – 6 
  • High School Grades 7 – 10
  • National High School Grades 11 – 12
  • Up to 1995 was the era of SBE
2.    1995 and ensuing years (2-6-4 structure) 

  • 12 years of schooling
  • Elementary school Grades 1 – 2
  • Primary School Grades 3 – 8
  • Secondary school Grades 11 – 12
  • The era of OBE curriculum dominated by a slow move from the 6-4-2 structure to 2-6-4 structure

3.    2015 structural change (2-6-6)

  • 14 years of schooling
  •  Early years/pre-school Prep 1 – Prep 2
  • Primary School Grade 1 – 6
  • Secondary School Grades 7 - 12

This was supposed to have taken effect in 2016, but did *not* eventuate. In fact, the change would have completely turned the system upside-down. The pre-primary levels would stay the same. But the primary schools were likely to take in Grades 1 -2 and dissolve Grades 7-8. And, the Secondary Schools would (in turn) have taken in Grades 7-8, hence have Grade 7 - 12 (6 grades altogether!).

4.    2018 - *indication of another* structural change (1-6-6) 

  • 13 years of schooling
  •  Pre-school Prep 1
  • Primary School Grades 1 – 6
  • Secondary School Grades 7 – 12

Indicated recently through the media, this is another changed hinted to have started in 2018. Teachers, especially the Tok Ples Elementary and Grade 7-8 teachers, will be the obvious group caught in the changing structure. 

Foundation years (ages 3, 4, 5 and 6)

It is indicative, in the structural changes, that there are only one or two years at the pre-primary levels. This level of schooling remains a lesser focus area among the on-going educational changes. By this I mean, there is a need for *more* emphasis on *quality* at the early-learning (preparatory) years. For example, the education changes could look at widening the base to 4 years of early learning; or ensure children at these early years are a own group apart; or setting a benchmark where teachers with degree and honours teach the children of ages 3, 4, 5 and 6 years.

The changes cannot ignore the fact that learning taking place at the earlier ages has significant effect on children's cognitive and academic development. A research finding pointed out that:
The early childhood education can have long-lasting effects on the children's cognitive and academic development. (Source: RAND, a renown research organisation )
One impending question is: 
Do the educational changes, such as the structural and curriculum changes, place emphasis on the pre-primary level and early-learning?

The changes in PNG's education structure (and curriculum) are for the good of every child, nonetheless. The challenge, going forward, is to re-evaluate and prioritise the early-learning structure - create a stronger foundation.

Research and Practice: A Step-by-Step Guide to Investing in Stocks and Shares

In the first post, PNG Insight emphasises the importance of research before investing in stocks and shares. Here is the link to the earlier post 'Why investment must have the right balance of the three starters: Research, Money and Approach'.
Unlock your investment potential

This follow-up post is, basically, a beginner's guide to finding your own way around the stock market by:

•    Investigating the 2 common methods for analysing stocks; 
•    Identifying 8 key stock-picking tactics; 
•    Setting up Stock and Share Account; 
•    Monitoring stocks over time; 
•    Choosing a Research that works for you; and
•   Busting 5 stocks and shares investment myths.

The whole bullet point is a process.  It can take years to confidently make the first investment. 

If you think investing in shares is something you can do in the future, you’ve got to start now . Understandably, researching and understanding the market now adds to your knowledge base as a potential investor. As you grow older you become wiser, making the the right investment decisions.

Let’s make a start.


1.    Analysing stocks – the key to successful investing

Two *common* methods of analysing stocks are called the Technical Analysis and Fundamental Analysis.

The technical analysis is used where stock researchers use price, volume, charts and behaviour of a particular stock to understand the overall performance of that stock before (during and after) buying the stock. This method is very technical in nature. Chartists are examples of technical analysts who use charts to identify patterns and trends to *predict* future share price movement.

Fundamental analysts research a company’s cash-balance statement, management reputation, global and local economy, commodity prices, and the overall *intrinsic* value of the company. A key indicator many fundamental analysts look for is the company’s cash.

Note: Both Technical and Fundamental analyses can be used together depending on what works for you as an individual investor. 

The minerals and oil & gas exploration companies are the *high* risk investments. Many of the *exploration* companies do not have cash at hand. If you are going to tread there, it is important that you tread carefully. 
2.    Pick stocks for analysis

This step is supposed to come before Technical and Fundamental Analyses discussed above. It is placed second because you need to know how to analyse stocks and shares before picking them. (No point picking stocks when you do not know how to analyse them)

The 8 ways to select shares before researching are listed in the table (not a complete list): 
PNG Insight Compilation 14/11/2017 (click on image to enlarge)

 3.    Practice makes perfect: fine-tune your stock picking/research skills

Now that you’ve picked a stock that you *think* (Step 2) to be undervalued and *confirmed* (Step 1) the stock is undervalued in your analysis, it is time to put your stock to test. This step is crucial to determine whether you can use the research technique employed here on serious investments in the future, or not. It is about finding out what works for you.

One way to do this is to create a Share Account with ASX and build your Watchlist. 

Step 1 – Open an account (free)

Go to MyAsx Registration page and sign up.

Step 2 – Create a Watchlist 

You can add, edit and view your Watchlist. Be realistic about the number of shares you are buying and how much you want to spend. Avoid adding random shares onto your portfolio - only add the stocks you researched. This will make it easy to test (compare) the stocks against your in-depth researches. A good practice.

Source: MyASX.com.au Screenshot 14/11/2017 (click on image to enlarge)
As mentioned earlier, it is important to track the stock you’ve picked and analysed (in Steps 2 & 1, respectively). And, to also find out *if* the research you did was worth replicating when making serious investments in stocks and shares.

Here is an example of a Watchlist. Though the monitory value is virtual (not real money), the other features (volume, chart, prices, announcements…) are live market feeds- delayed by 20 minutes. 
Source: MyASX.com.au (click on image to enlarge)