PRODUCTION STARTS 2019: BISMARCK SEA SEAFLOOR EXPERIMENTAL MINING IMPACTS NOT QUANTIFIED YET, MIT STUDY

1. Brief

Image: MIT Environment
Solution Initiative 
Nautilus Minerals is a small cap Canadian company, registered in Brisbane Australia and majority owned by an Oman Group. Described as an *experimental* seafloor mining company, engaging in the exploration and development of Seafloor Massive Sulphide systems in the Bismarck Sea. The company has planned to use remote-controlled heavy machinery and hydraulic pump to mine the minerals, including gold and copper. 


2. Planned Experimental Mining

The latest project update indicated that the planned mining activity will start early 2019. But no definite date was announced. In fact, the company has postponed the start of production from 2017 to 2018 and (in the latest update) to 2019. 

Mike Johnston, Nautilus’ CEO was positive about the seafloor production system: 
"The system remains on track for initial production during the first half of 2019, subject to further financing as indicated previously.” (project update, 10/10/2017)
Nautilus Minerals concept of deep sea mining is not very popular among the people living along the coastal regions of Morobe, Madang, Sepik, Manus, New Ireland and East New Britain. There is also *strong* opposition to the project voiced by prominent locals, Church leaders and national politicians (click here for details).


IMAGE: Nautilus Minerals via  Massachusetts Institute of Technology website 

Day Out with Children - 10 Adventure Activities To Do at the Port Moresby Adventure Park

A day trip to the Port Moresby Adventure Park is an ideal way to spend a Saturday or Sunday with family and friends. The park is also a tourist attraction in the city capital, Port Moresby. The park opens early at around 8.30 am and closes in the evening, at 5.30 pm. 

Other fun places to visit in Port Moresby 

  • Port Moresby Adventure Park
  • Sunset Lodge
  • Loloata Island Resort
  • Koitaki Country Club
  • Varirata Natioanl Park
  • Kokoda Track Memorial
  • Bomana War Cemetry
  • Tutu Beach

Just to clarify any confusion about the two parks in Port Moresby: the Nature Park is the one past the University of Papua New Guinea. It is within the city precincts. The Port Moresby Adventure Park is located opposite the Pacific Adventist University entrance. About 30 minutes drive from the city, along the road to Sogeri.

General entry to the park is free. That means that you can go in without paying and wander about but only pay (refer to fees below) if you are going to part-take in the park's organised activities. 

The Adventure Park has many fun things-to-do for both young and old. You can easily spend the whole day at the park and do all or some of your preferred activities.

Here are the top 10 fun activities to do at the park. A couple of the activities are free. But you must pay to do others.

1. Party or Barbecue: 

At the cost of K60, visitors can use the bbq hut (haus wind) for the whole day. The visitors are required to pay the fee at the entrance before proceeding to choose a hut. The image shows an area without the shelter - the actual hut is visible at the far end. There is no shortage of huts all around the park.

Source: Adventure Park PNG, Facebook

2. Wander through the Orchid Garden and Birds' Sanctuary 

 It only costs K5 per person to go in. The Orchid Garden has been one of the best-kept orchid gardens in PNG. There is a chance to also hear the Kumul (Bird of Paradise) singing as you wander through this beautiful garden.

Image: FIFA Women's World Cup

3. Children's Waterslides 

Waterslide is fun. It costs K20 per head. Always do the other activities before this one. Once the kids get-the-hang of it, there is no moving away until it's time to go home. Top tip: always take swimmers or shorts to be in the swing of excitement with the kids. 


4. Go Paddling on the Paddle Boats 

It costs K10 per person for 30 minutes. Another fun activity the kids would love. Top tip: take some bread crumbs for the kids to feed and attract the fish to your boat as you paddle along.


5. Merry-Go-Around/Carousel 

At K5 per person, this is sure to put smiles on the children's faces.


Kids are Loving it - Pee Wee Fishing at Royal Papua Yacht Club First Saturday Every Month

Pee Wee Fishing at the Royal Papua Yacht Club (RPYC) is a lot of fun for both children and parents. The kids and parents fun event is held on the first Saturday of every month. Fishing usually starts at 2.00 PM and lasts for 2 hours. 

You can find out about the event at the Yacht Club Facebook page. They usually create an 'event' for the Pee Wee Fishing on their page, so keep an eye out for it or message RPYC before hand.

View from the jetty
A fantastic group of volunteers dedicated their first Saturday of every month to organising this event. The event is made possible by 10 corporate sponsors and runs from February to November. Children are free to get a helping of snacks during fishing. Prizes are also given out after the fishing.

The prizes are awarded to the top three children. So kids and parents, make sure you catch the biggest fish or the most fish on the day. Small-talk on the jetty has it that stingrays, baramundis and crabs have been caught there, as well as fish pulled out of the water in numbers. 
There were also sightings of a 'big' sea snake just around the rockery recently :). You never know what you can catch at the RPYC Pee Wee Fishing event. Sunscreen, hat and water are a must to take with you. 


If you are a parent looking for somewhere to take the children out or kids wanting to have fun, this would one day of the month you wouldn't want to miss. Thank you and hope this helps to get the kids outdoor. 


Sponsors 2017

Fishing rods provided - you can also bring yours
Nov 11th 2017...not the 4th


Leave a comment below if you find this useful. You can also join PNG Insight () for more parents and kids things-to-do around Port Moresby.

Examinations 2017 Results: Education Department Acknowledged 28 Schools out of 301 Grade 10 and 164 Grade 12 Schools

Re-posted​

THE Education Department has recognised 28 high and secondary schools in the country who have put in a lot of effort to improve their academic performance.

Secretary Dr Uke Kombra presented the Best Academic Performing School and the Most Improved School awards to the schools based on the grade 10 and grade 12 examination results.

The top 10 academic performing schools for grade 10 are:
  1. Oksapmin High School in West Sepik, 
  2. St Charles Lwanga High (NCD), 
  3. Gordon Secondary School (NCD), 
  4. Cameron Secondary School (Milne Bay), 
  5. Jubilee Catholic Secondary (NCD), 
  6. Manus Secondary (Manus), 
  7. Busu Secondary (Morobe), 
  8. Mercy Secondary (East Sepik),
  9. Mt Hagen Secondary (WHP) and
  10. *not indicated from the source.


The five most improved schools for grade 10 are:

  1. Kompiam High School (Enga), 
  2. Sacred Heart Tapini Secondary (Central), 
  3. Misima High (Milne Bay), 
  4. Kiriwina High (Milne Bay) and 
  5. Yano High (Central).
The 10 Academic Performing schools for grade 12 are: 
  1. Port Moresby National High (NCD), 
  2. Marianville Secondary (NCD), 
  3. Kerevat National High (ENB), 
  4. Wawin National High (Morobe), 
  5. Sogeri National High (Central), 
  6. Aiyura National High (EHP), 
  7. Cameron Secondary (Milne Bay), 
  8. St Ignatius Secondary (West Sepik), 
  9. Passam National High (ESP), and 
  10. Mt Hagen Secondary (WHP).

The five most improved schools for grade 12 are:
  1. Utmei Secondary (ENB), 
  2. Busu Secondary (Morobe), 
  3. Ecom Secondary (Manus), 
  4. Manggai Secondary (New Ireland) and 
  5. Buin Secondary (AROB).
We want to recognise those schools which are making more effort to make a difference in the students’ life and academic life, so we want to reinforce schools to put in more effort towards students’ education” Kombra said.
“Out of the 301 high and secondary schools that sat for the grade 10 national examinations and 164 secondary schools that sat for the grade 12 exams, we know there are many challenges that are affecting schools in their own contexts.”