Papua New Guinea Politicians | We Don't Receive Enough To Support Our Lavish Lifestyles in Port Moresby or Australia - More

The politicians are getting massive pay increases since Sir Michael Somare was prime minister. Within seven years, parliamentarians would be receiving a whooping 82% increase in salaries alone.

  

Take a look at this. Sir Michael Somare’s government unanimously approved a 52% pay
rise in November 2010. A massive increase just before Christmas.

Puka Temu, the then Public Service Minister in Peter O’Neill's government, announced another increase of 7% in November 2013. Actually, that was backdated to 1st January 2013 and paid to each Member of Parliament before they went for their Christmas holiday.

During that announcement, the minister also declared a separate increase of 7.5% and 2.5% to be paid from 2014 to 2016 to every public sector worker, including the MPs.

For clarification, the 2013 increases were in three parts: a 7% one-off payment and a 3 year increase of 7.5% of the actual gross salary plus 2.5% of average salary. The average salary is all salary combined divide by number of earners.

Every servant-of-the-public will earn a 7.5%/2.5% increase, in installments, over a of course 3-year period, 2014 - 2016. By 2016, the public servants will have realised a 30% spike in their annual pay if the government remains true to its promise. That is 10% increment every year. 

Clearly, by the end of 2016 Papua New Guinea's politicians annual pays would have nearly doubled what they earned in 2010:

  • Prime Minister earns over K364 000;
  • Speaker of Parliament earns over K296 000;
  • DPM earns over K271 000;
  • Opposition Leader earns over K271,000 (same as DPM);
  • Government Ministers earn over K211 000;
  • Other MPs earn over K106 000; and
  • Provincial Governors earn over K74 000.
The amounts earned by politicians are exorbitant. Where is the moral of such increments? Such amount is more than enough to go with IF they had lived with their people. Sadly, they want more to sustain a lifestyle elsewhere other than their localities.