Showing posts with label Teachers Salary Scale 2013-2016. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Teachers Salary Scale 2013-2016. Show all posts

How to apply to a teacher's college in Papua New Guinea

 Want to become a teacher or education officer in PNG? The best pathway is through one of PNG's Teachers' Colleges, but you must have a GPA above the required threshold. 

In this article, PNG insight provides brief information about the 17 teachers' colleges in PNG and how to apply as a school leaver and non-school leaver (NSL).


What is the GPA for Teachers' Colleges in PNG?

The GPA for teachers' colleges in PNG complies with the DHERST (Department of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology). The threshold was 2.0, but the Department of Education  (which employs and registers teachers) has raised it to 2.4, see the news article.

Also, there are two important factors that can affect your selection to a teachers' college in PNG. 

  • Firstly, a threshold GPA is like the borderline - as an applicant you want to have a GPA that is higher than the threshold to increase your chance of being selected. 
  • Secondly, your grades should indicate consistency. For example, your selection may be placed in a pool or disregarded if you achieve great marks in most subjects - which are likely to give you a good GPA - but your English and Literature mark is terrible.

There is more to being selected than GPA. A good GPA increases your chance of being selected, but it is not the only determining factor. There is more decision-making involved in the selection process. 

GPA for Teachers College in PNG


Government scholarship TESAS 

Note that the government scholarship TESAS (Tertiary Education School Assistance Scheme) recommends a GPA of 2.0 or higher. 

You can be on TESAS when entering a teachers' college with a GPA above the threshold, yet if you do not maintain it in your first year, you'll have to go by as a self-sponsored student.

So, it is important to get a GPA above 2.0 and perform consistently across all your subject in Grade 12 if you want to study at a teachers' college in PNG.


How to apply to a teacher's college as a school leaver?

Applying to a teacher's college as a Grade 12 school leaver is easy. You'll have to do that at your school with the help of your teacher through the http://apply.dherst.gov.pg login portal.

Your school's deputy academic and class patron will assist you to make your choices. 

A top tip here is to make teachers' college your first choice if you want to become a healthcare worker in PNG. 


How to apply to a teacher's college as a non-school leaver?

Non-school leavers are the Grade 12 students who completed school in the last five years or those who upgraded their marks at FODE and want to study at a college in PNG. 

If you are an NSL, you'll have to apply directly to the college you wish to study. It will have the latest application form, school fee info and other admission details you need to know before applying.

Here is a link to help you prepare.


How to check your name in Teachers' College Selection 2022/2023?

The DHERST selects the Grade 12 school leavers based on the choices on the online application portal. It also compiles non-school leavers selection lists for the colleges.

The teachers' college selections for 2023 will come out with the respective heading - school leavers (for the current Grade 12) and non-school leavers (for those who have completed Grade 12 in the last five years)

Also, check to make sure you are on TESAS. If you are not on TESAS, you will be a SELF-SPONSORED student.

How Many Teachers' Colleges are in PNG?

Wondered how many teachers' colleges are in PNG? There are 17 colleges in the country that take in students yearly.

Also, the colleges are located in each of the regions. Check the college that is closer to where you are.

  • 1. Balob Teachers College   
  • 2. Dauli Teachers College   
  • 3. DWU OLSH Kabaleo Teachers College   
  • 4. Enga Teachers College   
  • 5. Gaulim Teachers College   
  • 6. Holy Trinity Teachers College   
  • 7. Katagu Lutheran Teachers College   
  • 8. Madang Teachers College   
  • 9. Melanesian Nazarene Teachers Colleges   
  • 10. PNG Education Institute   
  • 11. Rev Maru Teachers College   
  • 12. Sacred Heart Teachers College   
  • 13. Simbu Teachers College
  • 14. Sonoma Adventist Teachers College   
  • 15. Southern Highlands Teachers College
  • 16. St Benedicts Kaindi  Teachers College  
  • 17. St Peter Channel College of Secondary Teacher Education
teachers colleges in PNG application form 2022/2023


School leavers and non-school leavers info

Important disclaimer:

Note that this is not a formal advisory from any teachers' college in PNG. It is only a piece of general information based on insights on education & development information this blog provides for over 10 years.

Hope this information points you in the right direction as you make your choices and anticipate your selection.

Teaching Service Fixation Agreement (2014-2016) - PNG Public Service Pay Scale

New teachers and those who do not know how you are paid, you are paid up Scales of 1 - 12 (TS1 – TS12) and across Grades 1 - 7. In other words, you move up the Pay Scale and along the Pay Grade. It can happen simultaneously or one at a time.

Salary Fixation Agreement 2014 – 2016 Teachers Pay Scale and Pay Grade

Click on the link to see the latest pay increase for PNG Public Servants 2022 - 2024

PNG Public Service Pay Scale
PNG Public Service Pay Scale


A review of teachers’ salaries conducted in 2013 agreed to a 33% rise in base pay over three years, 2014 - 2016. The increment came at the back of an increase in the number of students and teachers increased workload; as well as the increasing prices of goods and services. The increment was, in fact, an agreement set in stone and effective as of the first pay of 2014. 

By now all teachers, from preprimary to primary and secondary schools, should be paid the agreed salaries at 2016 rates.

An additional Service Allowance of 10% was also accorded to teachers and matured in 2016. This additional increase means that between (and inclusive of) 2014 and 2016 teachers’ total salaries (TOTAL SALARY = BASE SALARY + SERVICE ALLOWANCE) increased by 43%. 


Teachers, perhaps it is important to know your pay scale and pay grade. Knowing the two will help you to determine whether you are receiving the right salary or not. The diagram shows the increase – take particular note of 2016 salaries.



PNG teachers pay increase


The Teaching Service is now accountable to teachers after the three years, 2014-2017. The TSC has got to do its work right. At the moment, two questions needed answers from the commission, TSC:

1. Are the teachers paid at 2016 pay grade?


This is a serious question and only teachers and school administrators know whether they received the promised increase or not. Make it your agenda in school staff meetings. Confirm your pay scale and pay grade. Make sure you are paid your dues. 

If you are sitting on a confirmed position (by this I mean a confirmed pay scale and pay grade); and not paid the right amount, raise it immediately and asked for a back payment.

Note: Do not waste your time if you are acting on a substantive level. Do not try to claim at that pay scale as you will not be entertained.

2. When is another review due?


According to the Teaching Service Fixation Agreement 2014-2016, another review was due on the 1st of January 2017. I hope TSC has not gone to sleep on it. 

This review has to be considered urgent. It is already overdue. The TSC, Education Secretary and Education Minister (in the new government after the June elections) must make it their number one priority. 

Having said that, the TSC commissioner and Education Secretary should initiate the review NOW. They shouldn’t wait. Another 3-year review (2018-2020) has to be swiftly done and submitted to the new education minister as soon as s/he is appointed to the role in the new government. 

All in all, increasing the price of goods and services and overcrowding in classrooms; capped off with a mountain of work, teachers deserve another pay increase. TSC must think right – take the lead, and urgently initiate a review of teachers’ salaries, service allowance and leave entitlements.

Papua New Guinea Politicians | We Don't Receive Enough To Support Our Lavish Lifestyles in Port Moresby or Australia - More

The politicians are getting massive pay increases since Sir Michael Somare was prime minister. Within seven years, parliamentarians would be receiving a whooping 82% increase in salaries alone.

  

Take a look at this. Sir Michael Somare’s government unanimously approved a 52% pay
rise in November 2010. A massive increase just before Christmas.

Puka Temu, the then Public Service Minister in Peter O’Neill's government, announced another increase of 7% in November 2013. Actually, that was backdated to 1st January 2013 and paid to each Member of Parliament before they went for their Christmas holiday.

During that announcement, the minister also declared a separate increase of 7.5% and 2.5% to be paid from 2014 to 2016 to every public sector worker, including the MPs.

For clarification, the 2013 increases were in three parts: a 7% one-off payment and a 3 year increase of 7.5% of the actual gross salary plus 2.5% of average salary. The average salary is all salary combined divide by number of earners.

Every servant-of-the-public will earn a 7.5%/2.5% increase, in installments, over a of course 3-year period, 2014 - 2016. By 2016, the public servants will have realised a 30% spike in their annual pay if the government remains true to its promise. That is 10% increment every year. 

Clearly, by the end of 2016 Papua New Guinea's politicians annual pays would have nearly doubled what they earned in 2010:

  • Prime Minister earns over K364 000;
  • Speaker of Parliament earns over K296 000;
  • DPM earns over K271 000;
  • Opposition Leader earns over K271,000 (same as DPM);
  • Government Ministers earn over K211 000;
  • Other MPs earn over K106 000; and
  • Provincial Governors earn over K74 000.
The amounts earned by politicians are exorbitant. Where is the moral of such increments? Such amount is more than enough to go with IF they had lived with their people. Sadly, they want more to sustain a lifestyle elsewhere other than their localities.

Papua New Guinea Teachers' Association Must Stand Up For Teachers Without Media Bashing

There is no need to go on strike yet. Teachers from Elementary to Secondary schools in each province have reps. They form the PNGTA. There needs to be a collaborative effort from them to fight for teachers' remuneration and benefits. 

Papua New Guinea Teachers' Association


Unlike before, Facebook (and access to it) has changed the way Papua New Guineans communicate. PNGTA (Papua New Guinea Teachers' Association) Chairman and reps from 22 provinces should, first, create an avenue for discussion. FB would be a good place to start. 

Papua New Guinea Teachers' Association



Papua New Guinea Teachers' Association to communicate with teachers' reps

They must stay in touch with teachers - communicate: find out if they have received their pay increase, Boarding and Duty allowances...etc. They have to have facts and figures at their fingertips. 

That information must be presented to the National Department of Education, Teachers' Service Commission and Education Minister on regular basis - this is their job. They MUST do that as well as 'media-bashing'. 

PNGTA must fight for teachers

The PNGTA must pursue legal challenges to ascertain irregularities in teachers' entitlements if they have to. They must ensure that the govt remains true to its PROMISES of pay increases. 

As I posted some time ago, by 2016 every public servant will have realised a 30% increase in their salaries - this includes the teachers. 

Recently, there is another increase in PNG Public Servants' pay (2022-2024) but the poor teachers will have to find out exactly what they are getting.

PNGTA has to ensure that the government does what it says

That implies that the PNG government has made a promise to pay the increase. So, PNGTA has to ensure that the government does what it says. If teachers are not receiving the increase or other entitlements over a year, they have to determine why. 

Finally, the onus is on PNGTA and teachers' reps in each province. If the association feels that there is a need to call for strike action,  by all means, they must do. 

But, going on strike (or pretending to go on strike by going to the media like the PNGTA chairman did) is not the best way forward.

Happy Christmas Teachers | Have You Got Your 10% Increment Government Promised You in 2013?


Many Papua New Guineans are looking forward to a good holiday. Some will travel home from towns and cities. Others will travel to see the bright lights of Lae and Port Moresby. Many will have stayed where they are. 

Cost of transportation and accommodation are very high. They may not be able to get through the holiday if they had not stayed back. One group of public servants are finding it really tough – the teachers. Their sentiments are shared on PNG Teachers on Facebook, a group of over 2500 teachers in the country. 

Unlike other public servants; teachers are poorly paid, overworked and often neglected at this time of the year. One of the main concerns they raised online was delay in Leave Fares. Though it is mandatory that eligible teachers are given their leave fares, the delay has been chronic and remains a yearly occurrence. 

Another yearly problem that affects our teachers is timely release of Boarding and Duty Allowances. Any teacher who does boarding duties throughout the year is entitled to this allowance. Why have many cry foul over non-payment? 

When Dr Puka Temu announced a Christmas Gift for the hard working members of parliament in November 2013, he also declared 7.5% increase for general public servants pay with a 2.5% concurrent increase to 2016. The MPs got their 7 % increase backdated to January 1st of 2013 are enjoying the other increases this year, too . But, the question of whether other public servants got their promised increment remains to be answered.

Teachers are not able to determine their pay grade. This is simply because many of them, especially the new graduates and teachers in remote locations, have not got their pay slips. Some may not even know what a pay slip looks like as they have never got one. 

So, how much are the teachers paid? The salaries are calculated by adjusting to a midpoint salary. In other words, an average is calculated from Pay Grades 1 to 12. The averages for 2014, 2015 and 2016 are K21 000, K23 100 and K25 410 respectively. This gives an impression of a total increase of 30% (7.5% x 3 yrs + 2.5% x 3 yrs) That means that the government would have been paying the teachers a 10% compounded increment between 2014 and 2016. That is a good news for teachers. 



Click here for teachers' pay structure. The challenge now is to ensure the government remains true to its promise to underpaid teachers. Teachers’ representatives from PNG Teachers Association have to highlight problem areas. There is never a better time to do it, than now. 

Put a stop to delays teachers face with getting their leave fares, ensure they get their boarding and duty allowances on time and get their pay slips to them where ever they are. Above all, the pay increments have to be evident in teachers’ pay. Have they got the increases for 2013 and 2014?

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