Teaching Service Fixation Agreement (2014-2016) Guaranteed 43% Increase on Teachers’ Salaries by 2016

Teachers Pay Scale and Pay Grade

New teachers and those who do not know how you are paid, you are paid up Scales of 1 - 12 (TS1 – TS12) and across Grades 1 - 7. In other words, you move up the Pay Scale and along the Pay Grade. It can happen simultaneously or one at a time.

Salary Fixation Agreement 2014 – 2016



A review on teachers’ salaries conducted in 2013 agreed a 33% rise on base pay over three years, 2014 - 2016. The increment came at the back of increase in number of students and teachers increased work load; as well as the increasing prices of goods and services. The increment was, in fact, an agreement set in stone and effective as of the first pay of 2014. 

By now all teachers, from preprimary to primary and secondary schools, should be paid the agreed salaries at 2016 rates.

An additional Service Allowance of 10% was also accorded to teachers and matured in 2016. This additional increase means that between (and inclusive of) 2014 and 2016 teachers’ total salaries (TOTAL SALARY = BASE SALARY + SERVICE ALLOWANCE) had increased by 43%. 


Teachers, perhaps it is important to know your pay scale and pay grade. Knowing the two will help you to determine whether you are receiving the right salary or not. The diagram shows the increase – take particular note of 2016 salaries.



What is in store for teachers in 2017 onward?

TESAS: Grade 12 Guide to Securing a Tertiary Institution Government Scholarship

TESAS-GPA-AES-HECAS-PNG

You were a Grade 12 student. Your Grade Point Average (GPA) is above 2.00. Yet you were not selected to continue higher education. Potentially, you can enter a tertiary institution in the country.

I do not want to raise your hopes too high. If you have a GPA below 2.00 - 2.50 you will find it very hard to enter a tertiary institution. This post aims to help the Grade 12 students who have a GPA between 2.00 and 3.00 and dropped out of the education system. 

  • If you do not know your GPA, see how to calculate it ⇦. 

In fact, there are many students who tried again and were fortunate to enter universities and colleges in the country. You can also do the same to secure yourself not only space but also a government scholarship - HECAS.

Research the program of your choice thoroughly

First, research the program of your choice thoroughly. The students' services and administration officers will provide the necessary help.  Start with the answers to the following questions before completing and submitting the application form:
  • What is the minimum GPA requirement? This question will help you to identify whether you are a hot, warm or cold applicant.
  • How many spaces are available? Knowing the number of intakes every year gives the applicant a picture of the space there are. According to the 12 Grade stats, five students are applying for every space available under government scholarships.
  • When is the closing date for submission? Getting the time right is important too - your application must not be too early nor too late.
  • What to do when you've made submission? Always follow up with the Students Services or Administration for updates. 
  • What if you are not selected having applied? Do not stop there. If you have done the first three steps properly (and are convinced you are the likely candidate), go to the institution and demand the reason why your application was rejected. This must be done before the start of the academic year.

Make every effort to secure a government scholarship

Second, make every effort to secure a government scholarship for the program on successful application. It is tight to get a Higher Education Contribution Assistance Scheme (HECAS) scholarship especially if you are a non-Grade 12 school leaver. That means that you will have to sponsor yourself during the first year of your study. 

Once the door is opened for you, get in, do well academically and apply for a second-year scholarship. Make no mistake, you must perform well and maintain your GPA in the first year. 

Importantly, on successful completion of semester one ask your lecturers, Admin and Student Services staff for help with completing an application for securing your scholarship. 

Complete the application form for tertiary students scholarship offered by the PNG government and submit the application around May/June to the Department of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (DHERST) in Port Moresby.

Follow up with DHERST Scholarship Office 

Always follow up immediately and on regular basis to find out about your applications. Thimon is one of the best persons to help you. His email is Thimon.Bune@dherst.gov.pg. 

To ask for application forms call 301 2052  or email ask@dherst.gov.pg. More information on government yearly scholarships ( TESAS, AES, and HECAS) can be found on the DHERST website


About PNG Insight
PNG Insight is an education blog. It aims to highlight the key developments in the education sector in Papua New Guinea. Started in 2014 on Google's blogger (now self-hosted on WordPress), PNG Insight strives to be a platform for critical thinking and discussions; and a source of information.


You can follow us on Twitter (@PNG_Insight) for the information on Education and Development in Papua New Guinea.

GRADE 12 SLF GRACE PERIOD: How to Adjust Choices on School Leavers Form


The school leavers' choices every Grade 12 student make each year is important. Many good students missed out on being selected, simply because they have not received proper guidance to make the right choice on the School Leavers Form (SLF).

Grade 12 SLF Guide Hint and Tips

I believe if the right direction was provided by the education leaders, students with good marks will increase their chances of entering a higher learning institution.

Good marks are marks with a GPA above the required GPA for higher education entry. For example, one school leaver said:

'I have a GPA of 2.8 and I cannot be offered a space in any of these (higher) institutions...confused?'

A GPA of 2.8 would mean that the student scored Bs and higher Cs. But, why had the student missed the selection to a university, or college, or vocational centre on government scholarship?

There are two important factors that disadvantaged capable students from entering the universities, colleges, or vocational and technical colleges:

1. The increasing number of students passing out of grade 12.

Take a look at the graph and you will realise that the number of students has increased since 2014. By contrast, spaces at tertiary institutions remained relatively low - only 20% of students were selected to continue after Grade 12 each year between 2014 and 2016. 

Unlike the 80s and 90s when there was a handful of National High Schools, today many secondary schools have been established in every province in the country. As the number of secondary schools increases, the number of students also increases. The competition is stiff. 

That is for every space available at a tertiary institution (under HECAS), five students are applying for it. 

2. Students choices on the  SLF

In fact, a 'funnel effect' takes hold where only the student with very good Grade 12 marks and good choices on SLF gets the preference during selections for university or college entries. It is absolutely important that you get both factors (Grade 12 marks +  SLF choice) right. 

Do not let your years of hard work and good marks go to waste. If you are an A, or B or C+ student, follow this rule-of-thumb to get a government scholarship into a tertiary institution:

  • SLF Choice 1 -    University
  • SLF Choice 2 -    College/Technical Institute 
  • SLF Choice 3 -    Vocational/Technical Centre

3. STAT- Test

The third and most important point to consider when applying for UNITECH or UOG is to sit for the STAT-P (aptitude) test if you are a School Leaver; or the entrance exam if you are a non-SL. All principals and deputy principal academic have to ensure their students intending to attend UNITECH or UOG must sit the entry test - it is mandatory.

It is anticipated that the University of Natural Science and Environment will also conduct entry tests in the future. Get more details on STAT-P, click HERE.

For the non-school leavers, avoid putting a university program as your second choice on your SLF - you are NOT going to make it. University choice on the SLF must be choice #1 if you believe that you will 'smash' the end of the year Grade 12 examinations.

Grade 12 Grade Period - Adjusting Choice

DHERST has not given students the opportunity to adjust their choice. The online School Leavers Choice system makes it easy for students to do just that - changing the choice on you SLF. 

This is plus for students as it gives you the best chance to match your Grade 12 final marks to the institutions of your choices as discussed in point 2, above.

About PNG Insight

PNG Insight is an education blog. It aims to highlight the key developments in the education sector in Papua New Guinea. Started in 2014 on Google's blogger (now self-hosted on WordPress), PNG Insight strives to be a platform for critical thinking and discussions; and a source of information.

You can follow us on Twitter (@PNG_Insight) for the information on Education and Development in Papua New Guinea.


PNG Work Permit - One Entry or Work Permit, One Job

The Government plans to review the work permits of all expatriates to ensure conditions have not been breached, and rules on the issuing of new ones will be stricter.

Labour and Industrial Relations Minister Mehrra Kipefa told The National that the department would implement a new policy from next year to tighten the issuing of work permits. A policy paper on it is currently before the National Executive Council.

“Our new policy starting next year will be one entry, one job,” Kipefa said.

Recommended: How to Renew PNG Passport


“We will review all work permits issued to expatriates to ensure they have only one job for which they were issued work or entry permit to work in the country.”

He said there had been some instances where some expats were granted a permit to do a certain job but then did other jobs.

“Those who found to be doing such will have to be disciplined, including cancelling their work permits and having them repatriated back to their home country,” Kipefa said.

Kipefa said there were of a lot of things to be fixed and he would seek the support of fellow ministers and state agencies to get things fixed.

 “We also have a lot of technical people coming into the country and doing jobs which our own people have the knowledge and the skills to do, and can competently perform,” he said.

“That is another issue I will be addressing.

“We will only issue work permits and recruit expatriates on jobs that Papua New Guineans are not able to perform.

“And these expatriates will be required to also train Papua New Guineans when they are employed here.”

Kipefa said jobs that Papua New Guineans could perform must be given to them.

“We will classify certain jobs, especially technical and skilled jobs only for our citizens,” he said.

“That is what I will be driving and we are looking at bringing the National Apprentice and Trade Test to the provinces and the districts.

“We have started with Mingende in Chimbu by launching a Trade Testing Centre for carpentry at the Saint Mary’s Technical School last week.

“And based on the success, we are looking at accrediting trade tests for other technical courses like mechanical, electrical, welding and plumbing.”

Kipefa said the policy on “one entry or work permit, one job” was expected to be tabled during the first sitting of Parliament next year.

“I am looking forward to giving a ministerial statement in Parliament on the policy and to commence the implementation,” Kipefa said.

The National - Monday,  December 04, 2017

Politics and Tuition Fee Free Education Policy in PNG

ABSTRACT

Though much has been written about the successes and failures of the Tuition Fee-Free Education(TFFE) policy in Papua New Guinea (PNG), there is a need for in-depth discussion on sustaining the policy not only now, but also in the future. This paper argues that the sustainability of TFFE policy is an important development issue. In particular, it attempts to discover how the National Department of Education (NDoE) aligns its sectorial strategies (and medium term development plans) with department’s vision, mission, objectives and goals.

It is essential that planning (both strategic and operational) by past and current governments focuses on continuity of TFFE policy. The paper uses literature review and online data to discuss the issue of TFFE sustainability. It gives details of policy timing, political parties and duration of the policy by comparing past to current experiences; discusses sectorial strategic plan and medium term development plans relating the policy; and also presents data analysis of TFFE fund allocations. The paper also uses percentages and average values to compare and contrast specific data relevant to support the findings.


There are two important findings. Firstly, the ruling political parties in 1981, 1993 and 2002 announced implementation of free education policy just before national general elections. The earlier attempts lasted less than 18 months because of the change in governments. Secondly, the data revealed lack of TFFE funding consistency in the last decade. ‘Political will’ in the last five years was remarkably high. This raised the question to the sustainability of the TFFE policy in Papua New Guinea in the long term.

You can download the Tuition Fee Free Education Policy in PNG PDF here (⇒ PDF download)


Declaimer: All attempts have been made to ascertain the factuality of information presented in this academic paper. Please, let the writer know if there is anything you wish to point out in the comment section. You can use the Contact Form or Twitter ().