Showing posts with label PNG Skill Shortage. Show all posts
Showing posts with label PNG Skill Shortage. Show all posts

APTC: AUSTRALIA PACIFIC TRAINING COALITION APPLICATION FORM AND INFO

There is NO COST to apply for a course at APTC, or for the Application Form. You will need to complete a separate Application for Admission for each course for which you wish to apply. Remember, you will need a valid email address to apply online.



Am I eligible to apply for an APTC Course?

To meet the eligibility for entry to an APTC course, you must:

  1. be 18 years of age or older to apply, AND
  2. meet the course entry requirements as listed under Entry Requirements in the course information, AND
  3. after submitting your application, successfully complete a:

  • Language, Literacy and Numeracy (LLN) Assessment to check you have the required level of English and Maths to cope with the study demands of the course, AND
  • Vocational Knowledge Assessment (VKA). A VKA is either a written test or an interview to determine if you have the base knowledge and skills required to cope with the level of the course.

APTC is committed to diversity and inclusion and encourages eligible candidates from diverse backgrounds, including women, LGBTQI persons, individuals from rural remote communities, and persons living with a disability, to apply.

In addition, APTC is committed to protecting the safety and wellbeing of children and adults as part of its vision, mission and goals. If you will be living and studying in a country other than your home country, OR if you are applying for any course that requires a Police Check, you must not have any convictions for any serious offence, especially violence against children or adults.

The following courses currently require a Police Check:

  • Certificate II in Community Services
  • Certificate III in Community Services
  • Certificate III in Education Support
  • Certificate III in Individual Support (Ageing, Home and Community)
  • Certificate IV in Community Development
  • Certificate IV in Disability
  • Certificate IV in Youth Work
  • Diploma in Counselling

How can I apply to APTC?

You can apply in one of three ways:

Online. You will need a valid email address to be able to register and create an account first. Then you will need continuous access to the internet to apply online, but can stop and save at any time.

By mail or email (complete the PDF application form on your computer and email, OR print a hard copy of the PDF form and mail or deliver to your nearest APTC Country Office.

Can I work while I study?

Studying an APTC course requires absence from the workplace for extended periods of time. Refer to the link below to Course Information brochure for information on the length of each course. If you are currently employed, this means you will need to seek the support of your employer to take time off to attend classes and complete course work.

What if my contact or other details change?

Applications remain valid for 12 months from the time you apply. It is important that APTC can contact you at any time. If you wish to update your contact or other details during the 12 months, please let us know by sending an email to applications@aptc.edu.au or contacting an APTC Office. After 12 months APTC will contact you to ask you to update your application.

APTC Fees?

There are three options for funding your course.

  1. Employer funded – where your employer pays your fees for you.
  2. Self-funded – where you, or a donor (other than your employer), pays your fees.
  3. APTC bursary (which is a financial grant awarded to students to enable them to study). Note that bursaries are limited. There is no guarantee you will be granted a bursary, and chances of being offered a place are higher for the employer or self-funded applicants.

More information about APTC Course Fees can be found here.

If you are not a citizen of, or not currently residing in one of the eligible Pacific Island countries, you may apply as an International Student. International Students are not eligible for any financial assistance, stipend or accommodation, and will pay international student course fees.

Checklist – Required Documents

Additional supporting evidence will be required. If applying online or by email and you don't have a scanner, take a clear picture of the required documents and send it to us. 

We recommend you have your electronic copies ready before you start your application. This will make the process easier and quicker.

 Electronic copies must be no more than 5MG in size, and only those with the following file type extensions can be uploaded: .pdf, .png, .jpg, .doc or .docx.

The additional documents are:

  • Photo of yourself. The photo must be clear, in full colour of your face and shoulders, and not include any other people. Ideally, this photo should be like the photos used for passports.
  • Proof of Identity. You can prove your identity with your Passport (a copy of the Photo ID page) or Birth Certificate. Alternatively, you may provide a Certificate of Identity, Voter’s Card or Driver’s Licence with a photo, and then show your Passport or Birth Certificate to APTC staff at Orientation to confirm your identity.
  • Proof of name change. You only need this if your name is different to that on your Proof of Identity document. Proof of name change could be a Marriage Certificate, Court Order, Divorce Decree, etc.
  • Work Experience evidence (relevant to the course you are applying for). The documents could be letters from past or current employers, payslips, a statement listing your duties, etc.
  • Education Qualifications and/or Training (relevant to the course you are applying for). This could include Certificates and Results.

Pathway For Grade 8 and 10: PNG Government To Increase Vocational Training Centres from 141 to 325, One LLG One VTC


Policy and documents on TVET
In 2013 there were 141 provincial vocational centres (up from 132 in 2009) and 9 technical and business colleges in Papua New Guinea. The number of colleges excludes Police College, Bible Institutes and others that have opened recently.

In fact, the need to improve Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) was well documented since 2005, evident in TVET policy 2005 [pdf]. The case study  by a Patrol Maino also provided a great deal of insight on expansion of TVET titled Efforts In Reorienting Technical Vocational Education & Training (TVET) System In Papua New Guinea (PNG) To The Global Economy [pdf, 2013]. The documents gave depth to developing TVET programs. 

These written documents explicitly echoed the need for government (who is the driving force for change) to invest in training at vocational level for Grade 8 and Grade 10 school leavers. Had the government and TVET division of education had done it right, there would be a good number of skilled workers in the country by now.


This does not mean either the government or the TVET division had done nothing. Actually they have done some fantastic jobs over the years. But, what is needed now is to take into account the HIGH number of students leaving school at the end of Grade 8 and Grade 10.


There is an urgent need to look into expanding capacity, finding avenues for job placements for vocational trainees and helping them to find their place in the society- an attractive package has to be developed for them now. 

There are no more that 150 semi funded vocational centres and technical secondary schools around - not enough to take in a good number of Grade 8 and 10 drop-outs. As a result, the TVET division must realise how important it has become of late.

The course work and curricula, workshop practicals, work placement and continuous training are the main areas needed both the government and TVET division of education (urgent) attention.

Government to put the money where its mouth is

Is it too late for the government to take an interest in this forgotten generation? The answer is no. It is not (never) too late. The need to harness the power of Grades 8 and 10 school-leavers is increasing as the number of these young people leaving school increases. If this population is left to its own, the nation will see a generation of unskilled young people who are good for nothing, but burdensome. 

Skills learnt early is vital. There is nothing wrong with the existing training provided at vocational and technical schools. The problem is that the national and provincial governments have been doing very little to improve vocational training in the country.

In the past, vocational training centres where set up to cater for the then Grade 6 school leavers. However, with the structural change [1993], Grades 8 and 10 school leavers have been competing for a space at vocational centres. Recent figures showed that 96% of Grade 8 and 94% of Grade 10 students drop out of school. These group of kids have little or no chance to enter a college, or institute or university. Many colleges and technical institutions are taking in Grade 12.


The Grades 8 and 10 are the ones who are in desperate need for attention. These are  the youths who between 15 and 18 years of age. We can not neglect them!

There is a genuine need for the government to develop a strong base by focusing on vocational training for students leaving at Grades 8 and 10. There is a difference between building a skilled and knowledgeable generation, and merely educating a population. Unless (and until) the politicians and education leaders see this difference, their attempt to achieve any development goals will be nothing but a wasted opportunity.

Each Local Level Government (LLG) to have a vocational training centre

To make a difference is to invest in those 15 to 18 years old. Is it too much to ask? Why not every Local Level Government is task with building its own vocational training centre? Why shouldn't each LLG have its own technical secondary school? Papua New Guinea has three hundred and twenty five (325) local level governmental boundaries. A government focused on developing its younger generation must also have 325 vocational centres - 141 is not enough. A responsible government must build 184 more vocational training centres. This is the right thing to do if PNG is to harness the power in this forgotten generation.


I would like to take a look at Pathway for Grade 12 – what is available for them and how the school leavers can be seen to have fitted into the system. This will be the next topic Teach Them How To Fish series on PNG Insight.

***Knowing how many of those institutions are available is not easy as no updated data is available online or I may not have seen any relevant data during my Internet search to compile this post. If you are reading this, you can do your part by including the institutions that are not available here – Wikipedia.


Apprenticeship Scheme: Upskill Grades 8, 10 and 12 Dropouts – Government To Fund, Industry Majors to Implement the Scheme



Recent Opposition statement reported in the media about developing skilled workforce in Papua New Guinea cannot come at the right time when over 80% Grade 12 students were unable to secure a place in tertiary institution. 

It is important to note that the K3.7 billion mentioned by the Opposition leader is a lot of money, especially when it is aligned with skill development. Program duration (How long it will take) and checks and balances remains to be seen.

The Opposition said ‘revenue to implement this policy would be sourced from the proceeds of LNG tax, resale of controversial K3 billion UBS loan and the Sovereign Wealth Fund via parliamentary budgetary process.’ [PNG Loop 19/02/2015]

It seems Don Polye, who was once deputy prime minister and treasurer, knows well how much money is floating around in government coffers. This is just politics but there is merit in his statement.

In the early years of our nation (1950s – 1960s) students choices were limited but policy makers can learn from it. Those who continued to be teachers and pastors were able to read and write well.

On the other hand, given the demand for work force, others became mechanics, drivers, operators, labourers and nurses among other skilled jobs. Many of the early schoolers have worked with construction companies like Dillingham Brothers, Department of Works and subcontractors to build the national highway we now called the Okuk Highway. Others started in Bougainville, Port Moresby and Lae during and after independence and eventually settled in various parts of the country.

So, why am I retelling the story of my father? He was a form 2 going onto form 3 but decided to be a mechanic. So he did – he became a Heavy Diesel Fitter Mechanist a few years after leaving school. His was successful in finding a place because there was demand for workers from companies like Bougainville Copper Mine, Dillingham Brothers and subcontractors.

Any government who wishes to develop skills today will have to create a working plan. A plan that would take into consideration the Grades 8, 10 and 12. And, how these young men and woman can be given the change to develop to their full potential. Begin by asking if are there any companies in Papua New Guinea who would want to make space for the 15 – 16 (Grade 8s), or 17 – 18 (Grade 10s) or 19 – 20 (Grade 12s) year olds. 

The key words are vocational training and apprenticeship. How can the Government creative incentives to attract companies to take in dropouts?

The Opposition (an alternative government) must know that with a K3.7 billion skill development plan, they do not have to create lots of vocational schools, or technical colleges of poly technological institutions. It is not only important to expand the facilities and resources, but to secure a working environment where newbies can rub shoulders with experts. This must be done through work placements and apprentice programs.

In fact, apprenticeship schemes are best programs as students are going to be working with company’s experts and equipment. No doubt, companies will welcome manpower addition to their workforce. But they will not want to pay or accommodate as they are companies wanting to make profit.

If a government comes up with a funded scheme, companies may step in to help. Unlike the early years, today there are World scale extractive, manufacturing, agricultural, building and logging industries in the country. Our current generation can be given the best opportunity if the Government creates are workable platform for companies to take in dropouts.


The opposition have come up with an alternative plan to develop skills. This was a call that came at a time when over 80% of Grades 8, 10 and 12 were dropping out of main stream school. Any government-private partnership for developing skill set in those age groups would be a step in the right direction. 

PNG Politicians On Recruiting Cheap Labour From Melanesian Spearhead Group Of Countries

Recruiting Pacific Neighbours to Fill Skill Shortage: Universities, Technical Colleges and other colleges in PNG collectively take in only 4500 Grade 12 graduates annually. Out of 21 000 plus Year 12 graduates, over 80% are ejected from mainstream institutions.

 MORE ON THIS STORY


Are there jobs in PNG job-market? The answer is YES.

Instead of recruiting from the Melanesian Spearhead Group of countries, PNG government (MPs Peter O’Neill and Richard Maru) should talk about expanding spaces at universities and college; technical colleges, business colleges, agriculture colleges and teachers colleges.

They should talk about apprenticeship opportunities with oil and mining companies. Their priorities should be to develop a generation of skillful people. This is what true and clever leaders do - have vision for their people.

Is this an example of a stupid plan? YES. Producing skilled labour was in National Education Plan 2005 - 2014. After 10 years and politicians are talking about recruiting labour from outside. That is not alright as there are over 19000 Grade 12 students dropouts, let alone how many at Grade 8 and 10.

Why not tap into our large pool of retired people? Are they not good enough? Why not prepare those 19000+ dropouts for future?

If (for e.g.) PNG #LNG lifespan is 30 years, it is not late to do just that. Forward planning is about having vision for the country you are running now!