Showing posts with label Skill Development. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Skill Development. Show all posts

APTC: AUSTRALIA PACIFIC TRAINING COALITION APPLICATION FORM AND INFO

There is NO COST to apply for a course at APTC, or for the Application Form. You will need to complete a separate Application for Admission for each course for which you wish to apply. Remember, you will need a valid email address to apply online.



Am I eligible to apply for an APTC Course?

To meet the eligibility for entry to an APTC course, you must:

  1. be 18 years of age or older to apply, AND
  2. meet the course entry requirements as listed under Entry Requirements in the course information, AND
  3. after submitting your application, successfully complete a:

  • Language, Literacy and Numeracy (LLN) Assessment to check you have the required level of English and Maths to cope with the study demands of the course, AND
  • Vocational Knowledge Assessment (VKA). A VKA is either a written test or an interview to determine if you have the base knowledge and skills required to cope with the level of the course.

APTC is committed to diversity and inclusion and encourages eligible candidates from diverse backgrounds, including women, LGBTQI persons, individuals from rural remote communities, and persons living with a disability, to apply.

In addition, APTC is committed to protecting the safety and wellbeing of children and adults as part of its vision, mission and goals. If you will be living and studying in a country other than your home country, OR if you are applying for any course that requires a Police Check, you must not have any convictions for any serious offence, especially violence against children or adults.

The following courses currently require a Police Check:

  • Certificate II in Community Services
  • Certificate III in Community Services
  • Certificate III in Education Support
  • Certificate III in Individual Support (Ageing, Home and Community)
  • Certificate IV in Community Development
  • Certificate IV in Disability
  • Certificate IV in Youth Work
  • Diploma in Counselling

How can I apply to APTC?

You can apply in one of three ways:

Online. You will need a valid email address to be able to register and create an account first. Then you will need continuous access to the internet to apply online, but can stop and save at any time.

By mail or email (complete the PDF application form on your computer and email, OR print a hard copy of the PDF form and mail or deliver to your nearest APTC Country Office.

Can I work while I study?

Studying an APTC course requires absence from the workplace for extended periods of time. Refer to the link below to Course Information brochure for information on the length of each course. If you are currently employed, this means you will need to seek the support of your employer to take time off to attend classes and complete course work.

What if my contact or other details change?

Applications remain valid for 12 months from the time you apply. It is important that APTC can contact you at any time. If you wish to update your contact or other details during the 12 months, please let us know by sending an email to applications@aptc.edu.au or contacting an APTC Office. After 12 months APTC will contact you to ask you to update your application.

APTC Fees?

There are three options for funding your course.

  1. Employer funded – where your employer pays your fees for you.
  2. Self-funded – where you, or a donor (other than your employer), pays your fees.
  3. APTC bursary (which is a financial grant awarded to students to enable them to study). Note that bursaries are limited. There is no guarantee you will be granted a bursary, and chances of being offered a place are higher for the employer or self-funded applicants.

More information about APTC Course Fees can be found here.

If you are not a citizen of, or not currently residing in one of the eligible Pacific Island countries, you may apply as an International Student. International Students are not eligible for any financial assistance, stipend or accommodation, and will pay international student course fees.

Checklist – Required Documents

Additional supporting evidence will be required. If applying online or by email and you don't have a scanner, take a clear picture of the required documents and send it to us. 

We recommend you have your electronic copies ready before you start your application. This will make the process easier and quicker.

 Electronic copies must be no more than 5MG in size, and only those with the following file type extensions can be uploaded: .pdf, .png, .jpg, .doc or .docx.

The additional documents are:

  • Photo of yourself. The photo must be clear, in full colour of your face and shoulders, and not include any other people. Ideally, this photo should be like the photos used for passports.
  • Proof of Identity. You can prove your identity with your Passport (a copy of the Photo ID page) or Birth Certificate. Alternatively, you may provide a Certificate of Identity, Voter’s Card or Driver’s Licence with a photo, and then show your Passport or Birth Certificate to APTC staff at Orientation to confirm your identity.
  • Proof of name change. You only need this if your name is different to that on your Proof of Identity document. Proof of name change could be a Marriage Certificate, Court Order, Divorce Decree, etc.
  • Work Experience evidence (relevant to the course you are applying for). The documents could be letters from past or current employers, payslips, a statement listing your duties, etc.
  • Education Qualifications and/or Training (relevant to the course you are applying for). This could include Certificates and Results.

Jobs in PNG: An Observation on Immigrants, Opportunity and Development In Papua New Guinea

I have been thinking about the different people who have visited, lived and worked and called PNG home. Many foreigners arriving in PNG (Immigrants) either are married into PNG or have white-collar jobs, but there are five (5) groups who fall outside this description. These groups were (are) influential in developing the country during the post and pre-independence era, even to this day. Actively creating jobs in PNG.

Jobs in PNG and Observation on Immigration and Development

I was born 4 years after PNG gained independence. That meant that I grew up with relatives who have seen the early stages of development through their own eyes. Many stories I’ve heard: 
  • missionaries making the first contact, teasing people with salt and introducing to the Good News; 
  • Tultul and Luluais encouraging people to use digging sticks to build roads or getting them together for patrol officer’s visits; 
  • young men employed to work at the Bougainville Copper Mine; 
  • Highlanders and Sepiks recruited to go to the New Britain provinces to plant cocoa, coconut or oil palm; 
  • companies like the Dillingham Brothers cutting their way through the inaccessible highlands provinces; 
  • the gaining of independence itself; and many other good-old fore stories. 
The Jobs back in the early 1960s were for PNG locals. Expatriates were trainers and mentors. 

Just before I turned seven, I’ve seen Australian and New Zealand contractors (like the Transet Contractor and Paragon) building roads into places like Okapa in the Eastern Highlands and Gumini-Salt Nomane in Simbu provinces and other parts of the country. Apart from all national workers, several of them were senior Philippines tradesmen who were very influential imparting skills to new PNG apprentices.

Then, I went to schools – community school, high school, secondary school and university. Many expatriate volunteers and missionaries have been a big part of developing the young men and women of this country, and create jobs in PNG.

Perhaps it is important to know that the foreigners, especially missionaries, have given their lives to help develop PNG. Meanwhile, sharing their expertise and skills with locals.

Another group that came into the country following independence was skilled people and expert expatriates entering the country as contractors and entrepreneurs. They were highly educated and experienced people who saw opportunities. Their aim was business.

So, let me put in perspective how each group contributed insofar as providing services, employing and educating Papua New Guineans is concerned.  I think the idea is to give meaning to immigration (the movement of outsiders into Papua New Guinea) and the impact their skills and knowledge has had on people associated with them and creating PNG jobs.

1.       Missionaries – Good News, health and education

Spreading the stories in the Old and New Testaments were their main goal. But as missionaries entered remote places, there was a need to learn local languages. Learning local languages was (and is) challenging. Almost every other village has a distinct language. So missionaries either learn several languages at the same time or introduce new language – so, there was the need for education.

Apparently, infant mortality and death due to infections would have been high then, as it is now. Many denominations, in addition to their primary role of spreading the love of God, would have seen it as their other responsibility to provide needed health care.

Today, many Papua New Guineans have relied heavily on education and health services provided by missions of different denominations. Among the leading churches are the Catholic Church, Lutheran Church, Seventh Day Adventist, New Tribes Mission, United Church and Baptist Church. Their mission is to faithfully spread the word of God. In doing so, they will continue to provide the much-needed health, education and humanitarian services in places where government services are lacking.

2.       Colonial administration era – colonialism and agriculture

This group of people have long gone, their era only remains in the memory of many. But, remnants of that time can be seen from coffee plantations in the highlands to cocoa and copra plantations in the coastal areas.

One of the lessons we could learn was the heightened interest in agriculture. It is important to note that apart from many things going on, the colonial era was also a time when huge portions of land have been developed for agricultural purposes. A significant milestone in agriculture shift in the country, from subsistence gardening to crop for cash.

3.       Independence buzz – Educators, health Workers, planters and contractors

The mid-seventies the to late eighties had seen a wave of human resource and physical infrastructural development. Many Papua New Guineans went to universities. Others continued onto trade courses, secretarial studies, seminaries and other colleges. PNG’s human resource growth was, to some extent, at par with developments that had been happening at that time.

There were lots of foreign contractors in the resource sector, many involved with infrastructure development around the country. Some of them working in road constructions, partnering with the National Department of Works (NDoW). They cut roads into areas never accessible by road vehicles in the past. It was a real-time for both human resource and national development. 

One group of Papua New Guineans still remained the forgotten generation to this day. Many of them have settled in new places. These were the volunteers from the Highlands and Sepik provinces who were enlisted for oil palm developments in West New Britain. My grandpa, who had actually returned home, told me that they were taken to Kimbe and Bialla where they were then given three hectares of registered land to grow oil palm.

Enviously, that was also a time when Kina was strong against Dollar. You could buy Ox and Palm for just K1.00, or a carton of beer for K10, or a Wopa biscuit or packet of cigarette for just 20 toea! People were not paid a lot, but what they earned could buy them a lot more than today with some to save. It was a real buzz.

During that time, there was a pocket of expatriates, especially Australians who took PNG at heart. They were the ones who had (have) lived here calling PNG home. From missionaries to government officers, educators and health workers. They loved PNG. Many of their children and grandchildren are Papua New Guineans.

4.       Entrepreneurs – business and opportunities

The country's purse is never empty. Money from natural resources and minerals, especially gold and copper from developed mines like Panguna, OK Tedi, Pogera, Misima, Lihir and other mines in the country had replenished the purse every year. Tax revenue had increased as many people earned and spent.

So, eventually, many outsiders have seen the opportunities available in the country. There was this wave of temporary immigrants who came into PNG:  setting up law firms, technology companies, medical hospitals, logging companies, retail shops, hotels, etc.

Many of them can speak fluent Tok Pisin. They mingle easily with the people. They also call PNG home. But, they came for business – one leg in, the other out. They set up business in PNG but resided overseas. They were very successful and well known in their own rights. They contributed massively to developing PNG and creating PNG jobs.

5.       Opportunity Seekers – recent entry

This group of immigrants came recently when the country saw unprecedented growth in the economy. Money circulating within the country was a pull factor for many other outsiders to make quick bucks. The frenzy of infrastructure development happening since 2013 and oil and gas developments had added fuel to fire. For example, with Chinese companies winning big contracts, they brought in Chinese workers who took up the opportunities otherwise would have been available to Papua New Guineans. Unlike Independence Buzz, this immigration wasn’t about development. It was purely business, self-enrichment and it happened quickly.  

Perhaps, this movement was more organised than the others. What happened was that well-established business preferred to use their own workforce. By this I mean these companies were employing their own kind, placing them in jobs that could be easily done by Papua New Guineans. Obviously, the 12-doors chain of stores in Lae and other parts of the country was a typical example, including the road and building construction companies in Lae and Moresby.

Another sub-set of this group was outsiders looking to Australia as their final destination. However, bureaucracy may not have allowed them to get in to Australia. Many possibly have families and friends living there. They remained in PNG and took-up jobs, some married to locals making PNG transit home. It could only be a matter of time before they would have the opportunity to make it to their Promised Land.

Here is where a line can be drawn: many outsiders have contributed, within their capacity, to imparting skills and knowledge to young Papua New Guineans. In turn, they are (were) making a living, bettering themselves and contributing to national development. On the contrary, it is clear that the more the other immigrants concentrate their businesses within themselves, the less there are training and jobs for ordinary Papua New Guineans.

Pathway For Grade 8 and 10: PNG Government To Increase Vocational Training Centres from 141 to 325, One LLG One VTC


Policy and documents on TVET
In 2013 there were 141 provincial vocational centres (up from 132 in 2009) and 9 technical and business colleges in Papua New Guinea. The number of colleges excludes Police College, Bible Institutes and others that have opened recently.

In fact, the need to improve Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) was well documented since 2005, evident in TVET policy 2005 [pdf]. The case study  by a Patrol Maino also provided a great deal of insight on expansion of TVET titled Efforts In Reorienting Technical Vocational Education & Training (TVET) System In Papua New Guinea (PNG) To The Global Economy [pdf, 2013]. The documents gave depth to developing TVET programs. 

These written documents explicitly echoed the need for government (who is the driving force for change) to invest in training at vocational level for Grade 8 and Grade 10 school leavers. Had the government and TVET division of education had done it right, there would be a good number of skilled workers in the country by now.


This does not mean either the government or the TVET division had done nothing. Actually they have done some fantastic jobs over the years. But, what is needed now is to take into account the HIGH number of students leaving school at the end of Grade 8 and Grade 10.


There is an urgent need to look into expanding capacity, finding avenues for job placements for vocational trainees and helping them to find their place in the society- an attractive package has to be developed for them now. 

There are no more that 150 semi funded vocational centres and technical secondary schools around - not enough to take in a good number of Grade 8 and 10 drop-outs. As a result, the TVET division must realise how important it has become of late.

The course work and curricula, workshop practicals, work placement and continuous training are the main areas needed both the government and TVET division of education (urgent) attention.

Government to put the money where its mouth is

Is it too late for the government to take an interest in this forgotten generation? The answer is no. It is not (never) too late. The need to harness the power of Grades 8 and 10 school-leavers is increasing as the number of these young people leaving school increases. If this population is left to its own, the nation will see a generation of unskilled young people who are good for nothing, but burdensome. 

Skills learnt early is vital. There is nothing wrong with the existing training provided at vocational and technical schools. The problem is that the national and provincial governments have been doing very little to improve vocational training in the country.

In the past, vocational training centres where set up to cater for the then Grade 6 school leavers. However, with the structural change [1993], Grades 8 and 10 school leavers have been competing for a space at vocational centres. Recent figures showed that 96% of Grade 8 and 94% of Grade 10 students drop out of school. These group of kids have little or no chance to enter a college, or institute or university. Many colleges and technical institutions are taking in Grade 12.


The Grades 8 and 10 are the ones who are in desperate need for attention. These are  the youths who between 15 and 18 years of age. We can not neglect them!

There is a genuine need for the government to develop a strong base by focusing on vocational training for students leaving at Grades 8 and 10. There is a difference between building a skilled and knowledgeable generation, and merely educating a population. Unless (and until) the politicians and education leaders see this difference, their attempt to achieve any development goals will be nothing but a wasted opportunity.

Each Local Level Government (LLG) to have a vocational training centre

To make a difference is to invest in those 15 to 18 years old. Is it too much to ask? Why not every Local Level Government is task with building its own vocational training centre? Why shouldn't each LLG have its own technical secondary school? Papua New Guinea has three hundred and twenty five (325) local level governmental boundaries. A government focused on developing its younger generation must also have 325 vocational centres - 141 is not enough. A responsible government must build 184 more vocational training centres. This is the right thing to do if PNG is to harness the power in this forgotten generation.


I would like to take a look at Pathway for Grade 12 – what is available for them and how the school leavers can be seen to have fitted into the system. This will be the next topic Teach Them How To Fish series on PNG Insight.

***Knowing how many of those institutions are available is not easy as no updated data is available online or I may not have seen any relevant data during my Internet search to compile this post. If you are reading this, you can do your part by including the institutions that are not available here – Wikipedia.