Showing posts with label Ganim Report. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ganim Report. Show all posts

The Most Important System: Future Of Our Nation Depends On Its Education System - PNG




Analysing the Education System From Within

David, it is worrying to see our education system - the system we've  gone though - has been battered over time. Your observation should be a concern for every parent. We know that education is our  future, our children are our future. The education system is the MOST important system in the country. 

Any change within the system must be backed by proper research and planning. Lack of it has resulted  in regression as evident today. 

Education leaders and politicians who are responsible for the education to the people have to start asking questions. 

They have to find answers to the questions: What can be done to improve the education system from here on? Will the change in structure and curriculum improve the education system? Will the planned phasing out of Gr 8 exams improve standard of examinations? Will the infrastructure developments bring better change? Have we seen an improvement in standard of education  through the government's Free Education policy?

I think there is no magic bullet. The deteriorating education standard we see today has resulted from years of unplanned and ill-advised policies. It is now time to ask ourselves 'what went wrong' and fix it.

Being Specific About What Needs to Be Changed - Positive Change

 We need to be specific when we talk about change. There are many changes going on at the mo. What 'good' change do we want to see? A good change (in my opinion) that is happening is the curriculum change OBE to SBE. Another good change also happening (but at a very slow pace) is government acting on Ganim's Report 12 recommendations. What else needs to be done to improve the system of education?

Proper Researches and Reviews Must be Happen prior to Changes in Education System

In April/May 2014 a parliamentary committee on education (PRCE) was investigating and reporting on teacher's appointment process, salary & remuneration (leave fares), functions of TSC and NDoE. The review was done at a time when teachers were having problems with leave fares. The government accepted the review and its 12 recommendations in January this year and allocated over K7.8 million to fund its implementation. Having followed development in education closely, I think this is the best thing the govt has done. But, I have yet to see the result on the ground though it has been nearly 10 months since the govt has accepted the review in principle. Here is the link to the stories I have been following http://goo.gl/YkkqzO

Ganim Report Is An Example of a Proper Review

The report recommends:

1. Review of functions and responsibilities of the DoE and Teaching Services Commission (TSC) in the Management of teachers’ salaries and entitlements.

2. TSC to review Teaching Services Act 1988 Section 9.

3. Review of relevant sections of the Teaching Service and Education Acts on appointment policies and procedures with the view to transfer off powers and functions to the Provincial Education Board.

4. Extension of tenure appointment from current three years to five years.

5. Review of ALESCO pay system enabling it to accommodate processing of all salaries and entitlements.

6. Transfer of full ALESCO Pay System and powers to the Provincial Education Board.

7. Payment of teachers’ leave fares direct into their accounts.

8. Annual teacher manpower update to be conducted in the first quarter of the school year.

9. TCS to assume financial autonomy as a separate entity of State as per the Teaching Services Act 1988.

10. Review of policy, process and procedures in the administration of retrenchment, retirement and resignation of teachers.

11. Review of a centralized modern electronic teacher information database that is easily available for provincial education authorities and other relevant stakeholders to have access.

12. Review of the TCS administrative and manpower structural requirements and resourcing the Commission, enabling it greater autonomy to effectively and efficiently administer and regulate powers and functions.

Great News | Cabinet Endorses 12 Recommendations by Parliamentary Working Committee on Education - Allocated K7.826 million

Post Courier report, 13th of April 2015...

The National Executive Council has recently endorsed the Ministry of Education’s response to the Parliamentary Referral Committee on Education’s (PRCE) recommendations, tabled in Parliament in August 2014. 

Prime Minister. Peter O’Neill, said cabinet has taken note of the Department of Education’s (DoE) policy paper and endorsed the Ministerial Statement together with the response made by the Ministry of Education. He said the policy paper and responses come after PRCE recommended:

  1. Review of functions and responsibilities of the DoE and Teaching Services Commission (TSC) in the Management of teachers’ salaries and entitlements.
  2. TSC to review Teaching Services Act 1988 Section 9.
  3.  Review of relevant sections of the Teaching Service and Education Acts on appointment policies and procedures with the view to transfer off powers and functions to the Provincial Education Board.
  4. Extension of tenure appointment from current three years to five years.
  5. Review of ALESCO pay system enabling it to accommodate processing of all salaries and entitlements.
  6. Transfer of full ALESCO Pay System and powers to the Provincial Education Board.
  7. Payment of teachers’ leave fares direct into their accounts.
  8.  Annual teacher manpower update to be conducted in the first quarter of the school year.
  9. TCS to assume financial autonomy as a separate entity of State as per the Teaching Services Act 1988.
  10. Review of policy, process and procedures in the administration of retrenchment, retirement and resignation of teachers.
  11. Establishment of a centralized modern electronic teacher information database that is easily available for provincial education authorities and other relevant stakeholders to have access.
  12. Review of the TCS administrative and manpower structural requirements and resourcing the Commission, enabling it greater autonomy to effectively and efficiently administer and regulate powers and functions.

”Cabinet has also approved K7, 826, 000.00 funding for the implementation of plans and programs for 2015 not budgeted and appropriated in the 2015 Budget Appropriation for DoE and TSC,” PM O’Neill said.

Papua New Guinea National Education Act 1983 Review, Education System Fit For The Country And Its People

Commentary

Papua New Guinea National Education Act 1983 review cannot come at the right time. The education department has to be complimented for reviewing the Act. 

Sections of the Act needed thorough scrutiny and update. Take a look at one example here - Section 4 on Objects of the National Education System:

'(1) (b) to develop and encourage the development of a system of education fitted to the requirements of the country and its people'  


In fact the country's requirements are different after 40 years. Population was not over 7 million in the years leading up to 1983. Government policies on national and local education provisions were not the same compared to yester-years. Many policies have changed like tuition free fee policy and education reforms. Economy is expanding. Literacy rate is low. Skills shortage is a concern. 

Inevitably, how can NDoE and National Education Board strike a balance in this Review? How can NDoE and NEB make sure this Act of parliament meets country's requirements and the needs of its people?


The Act is a legal framework that gives substance to the whole education system - it holds every sections within the education system like a skeleton is to the body. There is urgent need to update the National Education Act 1983. It must be done promptly and thoroughly.

Perhaps it is important this review takes into account changes that are taking (have taken) place since education reforms of the early 1990s. This includes considering the high number of dropouts, curriculum changes, structural changes, increasing population, changing government policies and everything that would make education fit for all.

Another point worth mentioning is correlation between Ganim Report and Review of Education Act. The report's 12 recommendations have direct bearing on Functions of National Department of Education and Teachers Service Commission (Section 29 of the Act).

It is only proper that the National Education Board considers this review urgent. NEB must analyse draft by May. NDoE, NEB and Education Minister must aim to see the act passed by Parliament before the year ends. This review has to take precedence among other changes. 




BY SHIRLYN BELDEN [Post Courier 26/02/2015]

THE Education Department expects to have the first draft of the Education Act review handed over to the national education board by May this year, Secretary Michael Tapo has confirmed.

"The review will be given to the board after we’ve checked all pros and cons.

"The full process to obtain complete legal status for the reviewed Education Act before it’s a law, or before it can be debated in Parliament, is not yet clear," Mr Tapo said.

The legislation was created in 1983 and had been used by the department since.

Works on the review started last year with four regional consultations already carried out with assistance from the Law Reform Commission and various government departments.

Mr Tapo said the Education Department was working with partners and stakeholders to complete consultations and draft documentations.

The reviewed act will then go to the national education board, which is the agency in charge of education system.

He said the department has planned to complete all works on the review draft by the end of this year so it can be presented to Parliament.

Mr Tapo said review of the 1983 Act has been a long standing issue, which the department has been contemplating on carrying out to provide a well challenged, quality and improved education system and structure for Papua New Guinea.

"We have to review the Act as the country is maturing, we need to develop education laws to the current demand and context of our society and circumstances. We need more qualified teachers.

"The school system has changed, a lot of people and organisations now want to build new schools, therefore, in order to administer and manage education efficiently, we need to understand that," he said.

Mr Tapo said the review was timely because the demand, expectations and context on how to administer education in the country have changed, giving the need to cater for these changes.

Papua New Guinea Education System: A System Battered Since Tuition Free Policy, No Plan Of Action

The National Department of Education has seen many changes. Dr Joseph Pagalio, Dr Musawe Sinebare and Dr Michael Tapo were at the helm and saw the changes through. They can attest to the fact changes are not bad.

But it is ominous PNG’s education system is undergoing four changes since Tuition Free Fee policy was introduced without clear guidelines. This is a recipe for disaster. It is better to avoid repeating mistakes encountered when implementing Outcome Based Education (OBE). This is a generational change. It must be thought through properly.

Lack of planning was obvious before school started. First, Papua New Guinea did not have a 10 year education plan to date. National Education Plan 2005 – 2014 (NEP 2005 – 2014) lapsed last year. If there was a committee working on it, why was it not out?

A 10-year plan is crucial. It puts in perspective a working plan for all stakeholders to follow. It would be better if NEP 2015 – 2024 was made available to everyone sooner rather than later.

The second change is the change is structure, Two-Six-Six: two years of elementary school, six years of primary school and six years of secondary school. I highlighted differences between new and old structures in an earlier post.

The education system is expecting a structural readjustment – just how this will happen is as important as when it will happen. The education minister mentioned that structural change will take effect next year, 2016. However, it would be better if he stated how NDoE would roll it out nationwide.

The third change is the change is curriculum. Make no mistake, reverting to Standard Based Curriculum (from Outcome Based Curriculum) is change in educational curriculum. It is about changing educational instruction – the way works is done. So, what kind of instruction is changing? What unit (or topic, or objective, etc.) is changing? What makes it different to OBE? How can stakeholders, including teachers, compare and contrast OBE to SBE? It is better to give answers to those questions to clarify misunderstanding, is it not?

The final change that needs taking place is implementation of 12 recommendations made by Parliamentary Referral Committee on Education (PRCE) on teachers’ welfare.  Ganim report cannot be left to gather dust. The education minister has to table this report. Parliament must deliberate on it findings. There is never a better time to hear our teachers’ cries than now.

All in all, since the government’s Tuition Free Fee policy started, the education system has got its fair share of battering. It is time to put in motion a clear plan of action and reward our teachers properly.

Education Minister Table Ganim Report, Parliament Must Act on the 12 Recommendations: Why Neglecting Teachers?

Hon Robert Ganim Chariman PRCE | Inset Education Minister Hon Nick Kuman
The Ganim report is what teachers have been waiting for. It has been completed by a committee sanctioned by the national government called the parliamentary referral committed on Education (PRCE). The working committee (WC) was headed my member for Wabag Robert Ganim, a long time educationist. This report was conducted between March-April 2014. It is gathering dust for 10 MONTHS. His frustration is obvious: why hadn’t the education minister table the report in Parliament?

Here is the report from Post Courier newspaper: ''The WC undertook the recommendations of Parliament which resulted in a detail Report that is ready to be presented to PRCE Chairman Ganim who then will present to Parliament for adaptation when it resumes on February 10, 2015 at 2:30 pm.

The WC Report provides specific policy directions, identifies strategic outcomes, provides general guidelines in implementing these policy directions, set out the monitoring and evaluation framework, and provides costing – about K26 million - for its implementation over a five (5) year period (2015-2019). 

According to the WC, the Government has work to do - in the long term - in addressing the teachers’ problems in these key areas:  
  1. Review functions of Teaching Service Commission (TSC) and Department of Education (DoE);  
  2. Review and define teachers’ salaries and allowances;  
  3. Review the teacher appointment process;  
  4. Review the tenure appointment process;  
  5. Review salaries and entitlements of teachers;  
  6. Decentralize ALESCO pay system to provincial education authorities;  
  7. Adopt an effective and efficient teacher leave fare management;  
  8. Create a leave fare data base;  
  9. Make TSC assumes financial autonomy as a separate entity of State;   
  10. Review process of retrenchment, retirement and resignation of teachers;  
  11. Establish a centralised teachers’ information database; and 
  12. Provide manpower and capacity development for teachers.''


Hon Robert Ganim expected the education minister Hon Nick Kuman to table this report in parliament during February sitting. No attempt was made to deliberate on the 12 recommendations by the WC.

Many teachers will see this as a 'slap in the face' as far as their remuneration and welfare is concerned. Right now, the education department is pushing forward with many changes in both structure and curriculum.

These changes are mounting pressure on teachers to not only implement, but also perform under trying conditions. The report cannot come at a better time than now. So, why are the 'very' people who are supposed to implement the policy neglected for a long time? Why are their welfare ignored?